AERA 2017 – State of the Nation: K–12 e-Learning in Canada

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AERA 2017 – State of the Nation: K–12 e-Learning in Canada

The 2017 annual meeting of the American Education Research Association (AERA) is currently being held in San Antonio, Texas. Yesterday Michael Barbour and Randy LaBonte had a roundtable presentation on the CANeLearn-sponsored State of the Nation: K-12 e-Learning in Canada report.

The presentation is described as:

State of the Nation: K–12 e-Learning in Canada

  • In Event: Roundtable Session 31
    In Roundtable Session: 69.056-17 – International Studies

Mon, May 1, 12:25 to 1:55pm, Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center, Ballroom Level, Hemisfair Ballroom 1

Abstract

Current research in K-12 online learning in Canada has focused on defining distance learning and its current strengths and weaknesses. Yet, the proliferation of e-learning has led to the emergence of new instructional strategies and practices for teachers in online and onsite classrooms. For these emerging practices little is known empirically, only anecdotally, as research into these practices has been limited or nonexistent, particularly in Canada. In this session, you will discover that all provinces and territories in Canada have some level of K-12 online learning, while many have some form of regulation related to K-12 online learning. However, few provinces and territories have any regulations related to blended learning; and the level of blended learning activity varies between jurisdictions.

Authors

  • Michael Kristopher Barbour, Touro University – California
  • Randy LaBonte, Canadian E-Learning Network

The hand-out that we provided from the session is available by clicking here.

By | 2017-05-19T01:50:35+00:00 May 2nd, 2017|AERA, Presentation, State of the Nation|

About the Author:

Michael K. Barbour is Associate Professor of Instructional Design for the College of Education and Health Sciences at Touro University California. He has been involved with K-12 online learning in a variety of countries for well over a decade as a researcher, teacher, course designer and administrator. Michael’s research focuses on the effective design, delivery and support of K-12 online learning, particularly for students located in rural jurisdictions.